Impact of registration on clinical trials on infection risk in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Little is known about the impact of enrollment on therapeutic clinical trials on adverse event rates. Primary objective was to describe the impact of clinical trial registration on sterile site microbiologically documented infection for children with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We conducted a multicenter cohort study that included children aged ≤18 years with de novo AML. Primary outcome was microbiologically documented sterile site infection. Infection rates were compared between those registered and not registered on clinical trials. Five hundred seventy-four children with AML were included of which 198 (34.5%) were registered on a therapeutic clinical trial. Overall, 400 (69.7%) had at least one sterile site microbiologically documented infection. In multiple regression, registration on clinical trials was independently associated with a higher risk of microbiologically documented sterile site infection [adjusted odds ratio (OR) 1.24, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01-1.53; p = 0.040] and viridans group streptococcal infection (OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.08-1.98; p = 0.015). Registration on trials was not associated with Gram-negative or invasive fungal infections. Children with newly diagnosed AML enrolled on clinical trials have a higher risk of microbiologically documented sterile site infection. This information may impact on supportive care practices in pediatric AML.

authors

  • Dix, David
  • Aplenc, Richard
  • Bowes, Lynette
  • Cellot, Sonia
  • Ethier, Marie-Chantal
  • Feusner, Jim
  • Gillmeister, Biljana
  • Johnston, Donna L
  • Lewis, Victor
  • Michon, Bruno
  • Mitchell, David
  • Portwine, Carol
  • Price, Victoria
  • Silva, Mariana
  • Stobart, Kent
  • Yanofsky, Rochelle
  • Zelcer, Shayna
  • Beyene, Joseph
  • Sung, Lillian

publication date

  • April 1, 2016