Modeling the mental health service utilization decisions of university undergraduates: A discrete choice conjoint experiment Academic Article uri icon

  •  
  • Overview
  •  
  • Research
  •  
  • Identity
  •  
  • Additional Document Info
  •  
  • View All
  •  

abstract

  • OBJECTIVE: We modeled design factors influencing the intent to use a university mental health service. PARTICIPANTS: Between November 2012 and October 2014, 909 undergraduates participated. METHOD: Using a discrete choice experiment, participants chose between hypothetical campus mental health services. RESULTS: Latent class analysis identified three segments. A Psychological/Psychiatric Service segment (45.5%) was most likely to contact campus health services delivered by psychologists or psychiatrists. An Alternative Service segment (39.3%) preferred to talk to peer-counselors who had experienced mental health problems. A Hesitant segment (15.2%) reported greater distress but seemed less intent on seeking help. They preferred services delivered by psychologists or psychiatrists. Simulations predicted that, rather than waiting for standard counseling, the Alternative Service segment would prefer immediate access to E-Mental health. The Usual Care and Hesitant segments would wait 6 months for standard counseling. CONCLUSIONS: E-Mental Health options could engage students who may not wait for standard services.

publication date

  • August 18, 2017