The Adaptive Response Modifies Latency for Radiation-Induced Myeloid Leukemia in CBA/H Mice Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • We have investigated the effect of the adaptive response on acute myeloid leukemia (AML) induced in CBA/Harwell mice by a chronic radiation exposure. Groups of mice irradiated with a total dose of 1. 0 Gy at two different chronic dose rates (0.5, 0.004 Gy/h) had similar frequencies of AML. Compared to control animals that did not develop AML, irradiation at either of these dose rates did not change the longevity of the mice that did not die of leukemia. The survival rates of irradiated mice that did develop leukemia in the two groups were not different from each other, indicating that the dose rates produced similar responses and therefore were both chronic exposures. We then tested the ability of a chronic 10-cGy (0. 5 Gy/h) exposure to ionizing radiation, mild hyperthermia (40.5 degrees C whole-body, 60 min) or treatment with interleukin-1 (1500 U i.p.) to induce an adaptive response and modify the frequency or latency of AML which resulted from a subsequent (24 h later) 1.0-Gy (0.5 Gy/h) chronic radiation exposure. The frequency of radiation-induced leukemia was not changed in mice given any of the three adapting treatments 24 h prior to the chronic 1.0-Gy dose that induced leukemia. However, the latent period for development of AML was significantly increased by both the prior low radiation dose and mild hyperthermia treatment. Injection of interleukin-1, in contrast, may have reduced the latent period. Similar to the single 1.0-Gy chronic exposure alone, none of the adapting treatments prior to that exposure influenced the survival of animals that did not develop AML. These results indicate that an earlier exposure to a small adapting dose of radiation or to a mild heat stress can influence secondary steps in radiation-induced carcinogenesis.

publication date

  • September 1999

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