Preferences for evidence-based practice dissemination in addiction agencies serving women: a discrete-choice conjoint experiment Academic Article uri icon

  •  
  • Overview
  •  
  • Research
  •  
  • Identity
  •  
  • Additional Document Info
  •  
  • View All
  •  

abstract

  • AIM:   To model variables influencing the dissemination of evidence-based practices to addiction service providers and administrators. DESIGN:   A discrete-choice conjoint experiment. We systematically varied combinations of 16 dissemination variables that might influence the adoption of evidence-based practices. Participants chose between sets of variables. SETTING:   Canadian agencies (n = 333) providing addiction services to women. PARTICIPANTS:   Service providers and administrators (n = 1379). MEASUREMENTS:   We estimated the relative importance and optimal level of each dissemination variable. We used latent class analysis to identify subsets of participants with different preferences and simulated the conditions under which participants would use more demanding professional development options. FINDINGS:   Three subsets of participants were identified: outcome-sensitive (52%), process-sensitive (29.6%) and demand-sensitive (18.2%). Across all participants, the number of clients who were expected to benefit from an evidence-based practice exerted the most influence on dissemination choices. If a practice was seen as feasible, co-worker and administrative support influenced decisions. Client benefits were most important to outcome-sensitive participants; type of dissemination process (e.g. active versus passive learning) was more important to process-sensitive participants. Brief options with little follow-up were preferred by demand-sensitive participants. Simulations predicted that initiatives selected and endorsed by government funders would reduce participation. CONCLUSIONS:   Clinicians and administrators are more likely to adopt evidence-based addiction practices if the practice is seen as helpful to clients, and if it is supported by co-workers and program administration.

publication date

  • August 2012

has subject area