Diagnosis of colonic dysmotility associated with autonomic dysfunction in patients with chronic refractory constipation Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • AbstractWe report the first study assessing human colon manometric features and their correlations with changes in autonomic functioning in patients with refractory chronic constipation prior to consideration of surgical intervention. High-resolution colonic manometry (HRCM) with simultaneous heart rate variability (HRV) was performed in 14 patients, and the resulting features were compared to healthy subjects. Patients were categorized into three groups that had normal, weak, or no high amplitude propagating pressure waves (HAPWs) to any intervention. We found mild vagal pathway impairment presented as lower HAPW amplitude in the proximal colon in response to proximal colon balloon distention. Left colon dysmotility was observed in 71% of patients, with features of (1) less left colon HAPWs, (2) lower left colon HAPW amplitudes (69.8 vs 102.3 mmHg), (3) impaired coloanal coordination, (4) left colon hypertonicity in patients with coccyx injury. Patients showed the following autonomic dysfunction: (1) high sympathetic tone at baseline, (2) high sympathetic reactivity to active standing and meal, (3) correlation of low parasympathetic reactivity to the meal with absence of the coloanal reflex, (4) lower parasympathetic and higher sympathetic activity during occurrence of HAPWs. In conclusion, left colon dysmotility and high sympathetic tone and reactivity, more so than vagal pathway impairment, play important roles in refractory chronic constipation and suggests sacral neuromodulation as a possible treatment.

publication date

  • December 2022