Effect of physical activity on bone mineral density assessed by limb dominance across the lifespan. Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Bone mineral density is higher in dominant vs. nondominant limbs, implying that the greater use of dominant limbs in everyday activities results in the deposition of more bone or that the dominant limb is genetically larger. The objective of the present study was to determine whether bone mineral density differences between dominant and nondominant arms were greater in older vs. younger women. To determine whether this was due to a greater lifetime of preferential loading of the dominant arm, differences between dominant and nondominant arms were compared to accumulated amounts of physical activities which emphasized use of the dominant arm. Bone mineral density of dominant and nondominant arms was assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in groups of younger (n = 35; age = 20.9) and older (n = 53; age = 57.4) women. The difference between arms was greater in the older vs. the younger group (5.2% vs. 1.9%, respectively, P < 0.01). Within the older group, total lifetime energy expenditure during activities emphasizing loading of the dominant arm correlated with the bone mineral difference between dominant and nondominant arms (r = 0.47, P < 0.01). This implies that a greater lifetime of preferential loading of the dominant arm in the older group resulted in a greater difference between arms. Am. J. Hum. Biol. 12:633-637, 2000. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

authors

  • Chilibeck, Philip D
  • Davison, K Shawn
  • Sale, Digby Graham
  • Webber, Colin E
  • Faulkner, Robert A

publication date

  • September 2000