The formation and evolution of bars in low surface brightness galaxies with cold dark matter haloes Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • We perform several high resolution N-Body/SPH simulations of low surface brightness galaxies (LSBs) embedded in cold dark matter halos to study how likely is bar formation in such systems. The behavior of various collisionless galaxy models is studied both in isolation and in the presence of a large perturbing satellite. We also consider models with a dominant gaseous component in the disk. We find that in general bar formation requires disk masses at least a factor of 2 higher than those inferred for LSBs under the assumption of a normal stellar mass-to-light ratio. Low surface density stellar disks contributing less than 10% of the total virial mass are stable within NFW halos spanning a range of concentrations. However, a purely gaseous disk can form a bar even for quite low masses and for realistic temperatures provided that cooling is very efficient (we adopt an isothermal equation of state) and that the halo has a very low concentration, c < 5. The bars that form in these LSB models are shorter than the typical halo scale radius - their overall angular momentum content might be too low to affect significantly the inner dark halo structure. Once formed, all the bars evolve into bulge-like structures in a few Gyr and can excite spiral patterns in the surrounding disk component. The recently discovered red LSBs show significant non-axisymmetric structure and bulge-like components and share many of their structural properties with the final states of our LSB models with massive disks. Our results imply that a bulge-like component must be present in any low surface brightness galaxy that ever went bar unstable in the past.

publication date

  • January 2004