Baseline factors associated with self-reported disease flares following COVID-19 vaccination among adults with systemic rheumatic disease: results from the COVID-19 global rheumatology alliance vaccine survey Academic Article uri icon

  •  
  • Overview
  •  
  • Research
  •  
  • Identity
  •  
  • Additional Document Info
  •  
  • View All
  •  

abstract

  • Abstract Objective To examine the frequency of, and risk factors for, disease flare following COVID-19 vaccination in patients with systemic rheumatic disease (SRD). Methods An international study was conducted from 2 April to 16 August 2021, using an online survey of 5619 adults with SRD for adverse events following COVID-19 vaccination, including flares of disease requiring a change in treatment. We examined risk factors identified a priori based on published associations with SRD activity and SARS-CoV-2 severity, including demographics, SRD type, comorbidities, vaccine type, cessation of immunosuppressive medications around vaccination and history of reactions to non-COVID-19 vaccines, using multivariable logistic regression. Results Flares requiring a change in treatment following COVID-19 vaccination were reported by 4.9% of patients. Compared with rheumatoid arthritis, certain SRD, including systemic lupus erythematosus (OR 1.51, 95% CI 1.03, 2.20), psoriatic arthritis (OR 1.95, 95% CI 1.20, 3.18) and polymyalgia rheumatica (OR 1.94, 95% CI 1.08, 2.48) were associated with higher odds of flare, while idiopathic inflammatory myopathies were associated with lower odds for flare (OR 0.54, 95% CI 0.31–0.96). The Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine was associated with higher odds of flare relative to the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine (OR 1.44, 95% CI 1.07, 1.95), as were a prior reaction to a non-COVID-19 vaccine (OR 2.50, 95% CI 1.76, 3.54) and female sex (OR 2.71, 95% CI 1.55, 4.72). Conclusion SRD flares requiring changes in treatment following COVID-19 vaccination were uncommon in this large international study. Several potential risk factors, as well as differences by disease type, warrant further examination in prospective cohorts.

authors

  • Rider, Lisa G
  • Parks, Christine G
  • Wilkerson, Jesse
  • Schiffenbauer, Adam I
  • Kwok, Richard K
  • Noroozi Farhadi, Payam
  • Nazir, Sarvar
  • Ritter, Rebecca
  • Sirotich, Emily
  • Kennedy, Kevin
  • Larche, Margaret
  • Levine, Mitchell
  • Sattui, Sebastian E
  • Liew, Jean W
  • Harrison, Carly O
  • Moni, Tarin T
  • Miller, Aubrey K
  • Putman, Michael
  • Hausmann, Jonathan
  • Simard, Julia F
  • Sparks, Jeffrey A
  • Miller, Frederick W
  • Akpabio, Akpabio A
  • Alpizar-Rodriguez, Deshire
  • Berenbaum, Francis
  • Bulina, Inita
  • Conway, Richard
  • Singh, Aman Dev
  • Duff, Eimear
  • Durrant, Karen
  • Gheita, Tamer A
  • Hill, Catherine L
  • Howard, Richard
  • Hoyer, Bimba F
  • Hsieh, Evelyn
  • el Kibbi, Lina
  • Kilian, Adam
  • Kim, Alfred HJ
  • Liew, David
  • Lo, Chieh
  • Miller, Bruce
  • Mingolla, Serena
  • Nudel, Michal
  • Palmerlee, Candace A
  • Singh, Jasvinder A
  • Singh, Namrata
  • Ugarte-Gil, Manuel F
  • Wallace, John
  • Young, Kristen J
  • Bhana, Suleman
  • Costello, Wendy
  • Grainger, Rebecca
  • Machado, Pedro M
  • Robinson, Philip C
  • Sufka, Paul
  • Wallace, Zachary S
  • Yazdany, Jinoos
  • Foster, Gary
  • Thabane, Lehana
  • Angevare, Saskya
  • Beesley, Richard P
  • Chock, Eugenia
  • Degirmenci, Berk
  • Felix, Christele
  • Jin, Shangyi
  • Mateus, Elsa
  • Peirce, Andrea
  • Sari, Esra
  • Tseng, Robert
  • Wang, Leslie
  • Zamora, Erick Adrian

publication date

  • June 28, 2022