Closed Incision Negative Pressure Therapy Versus Traditional Dressings for Low Transverse Abdominal Incisions Healing by Primary Closure: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Background: Closed incision negative pressure therapy (ciNPT) devices may reduce wound healing complications when applied to closed surgical incisions. The aim of this review was to assess the effects of ciNPT versus standard dressings in patients undergoing primary closure of high tension, lower transverse abdominal incisions. Methods: This review was registered a priori on PROSPERO (CRD42021252048). A search of the following databases was performed in February 2021: Medline, EMBASE, and CENTRAL. Unpublished trials were searched using clinicaltrials.gov. All randomized and nonrandomized studies comparing ciNPT to standard dressings were included. Two independent reviewers performed screening and data extraction. Outcomes evaluated the incidence of wound dehiscence, surgical site infection, total abdominal complications, time to drain removal, and seroma formation. Main Results: Ten studies were included in quantitative and narrative synthesis. Observational study evidence suggests ciNPT likely reduces the incidence of wound dehiscence (odds ratio [OR] 0.57 [0.44-0.96], P = .03) and total abdominal complications (OR 0.34 [0.21-0.54], P < .01). Decreased incidence of seroma formation favored ciNPT (OR 0.65 [0.24-1.76], P = .40); however, this did not achieve significance. Randomized and non-randomized study evidence was very uncertain about the effect of ciNPT on the remaining outcomes. Conclusions: The current best randomized study evidence is very uncertain about the effect of ciNPT on these outcomes. Observational study evidence suggests ciNPT likely results in a statistically significant reduction in abdominal wound dehiscence and total abdominal complications. Additional randomized trials are warranted to limit the impact of bias on the overall certainty of the evidence.

publication date

  • January 25, 2022