Characterization of a Radiation-Induced Stress Response Communicated in Vivo between Zebrafish Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Radiation-induced communication of stress signals between rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss W) have recently been described by this group and linked to the bystander effect. This paper addresses the question of whether another totally unrelated fish species (Danio rerio L) can demonstrate the effect and also looks at attenuation of both the bystander signal, from irradiated fish, and the bystander effect, in naive fish. The data show that zebrafish produce bystander signals, and that, as with rainbow trout these can affect naïve (i.e., non-irradiated) fish placed in water with X-rayed fish or in water previously occupied by X-rayed fish. Skin explants from directly X-rayed fish still reduce HPV-G reporter cell growth 6 h after X-ray, but the bystander signal to naïve fish is lost. Twelve h after X-ray the signal is lost in X-rayed fish. The bystander effect is also attenuated if induction was by placing naïve fish in water which previously held the X-rayed fish. However, the effect is retained if induction was by placing X-rayed and naïve fish together. This suggests the signal is not retained by water for long periods of time. Individual fish data reveal unique responses by bystander fish which could indicate varying levels of sensitivity to signal strength among individuals.

publication date

  • May 2007