Utilizing image scales towards totally training free blind image quality assessment Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • A new approach to blind image quality assessment (BIQA), requiring no training, is proposed in this paper. The approach is named as blind image quality evaluator based on scales and works by evaluating the global difference of the query image analyzed at different scales with the query image at original resolution. The approach is based on the ability of the natural images to exhibit redundant information over various scales. A distorted image is considered as a deviation from the natural image and bereft of the redundancy present in the original image. The similarity of the original resolution image with its down-scaled version will decrease more when the image is distorted more. Therefore, the dissimilarities of an image with its low-resolution versions are cumulated in the proposed method. We dissolve the query image into its scale-space and measure the global dissimilarity with the co-occurrence histograms of the original and its scaled images. These scaled images are the low pass versions of the original image. The dissimilarity, called low pass error, is calculated by comparing the low pass versions across scales with the original image. The high pass versions of the image in different scales are obtained by Wavelet decomposition and their dissimilarity from the original image is also calculated. This dissimilarity, called high pass error, is computed with the variance and gradient histograms and weighted by the contrast sensitivity function to make it perceptually effective. These two kinds of dissimilarities are combined together to derive the quality score of the query image. This method requires absolutely no training with the distorted image, pristine images, or subjective human scores to predict the perceptual quality but uses the intrinsic global change of the query image across scales. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated across six publicly available databases and found to be competitive with the state-of-the-art techniques.

publication date

  • 2015