Muscle and Myotendinous Tissue Properties at the Distal Tibia as Assessed by High-Resolution Peripheral Quantitative Computed Tomography. Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • High-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) quantifies bone microstructure and density at the distal tibia where there is also a sizable amount of myotendinous (muscle and tendon) tissue (MT); however, there is no method for the quantification of MT. This study aimed (1) to assess the feasibility of using HR-pQCT distal tibia scans to estimate MT properties using a custom algorithm, and (2) to determine the relationship between MT properties at the distal tibia and mid-leg muscle density (MD) obtained from pQCT. Postmenopausal women from the Hamilton cohort of the Canadian Multicenter Osteoporosis Study had a single-slice (2.3 ± 0.5 mm) 66% site pQCT scan measuring muscle cross-sectional area (MCSA) and MD. A standard HR-pQCT scan was acquired at the distal tibia. HR-pQCT-derived MT cross-sectional area (MTCSA) and MT density (MTD) were calculated using a custom algorithm in which thresholds (34.22-194.32 mg HA/cm3) identified muscle seed volumes and were iteratively expanded. Pearson and Bland-Altman plots were used to assess correlations and systematic differences between pQCT- and HR-pQCT-derived muscle properties. Among 45 women (mean age: 74.6 ± 8.5 years, body mass index: 25.9 ± 4.3 kg/m2), MTD was moderately correlated with mid-leg MD across the 2 modalities (r = 0.69-0.70, p < 0.01). Bland-Altman analyses revealed no evidence of directional bias for MTD-MD. HR-pQCT and pQCT measures of MTCSA and MCSA were moderately correlated (r = 0.44, p < 0.01). Bland-Altman plots for MTCSA revealed that larger MCSAs related to larger discrepancy between the distal and the mid-leg locations. This is the first study to assess the ability of HR-pQCT to measure MT size, density, and morphometry. HR-pQCT-derived MTD was moderately correlated with mid-leg MD from pQCT. This relationship suggests that distal MT may share common properties with muscle throughout the length of the leg. Future studies will assess the value of HR-pQCT-derived MT properties in the context of falls, mobility, and balance.

publication date

  • April 2017