Distinguishing Between Mouse and Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Regulation: The Best Laid Plans of Mice and Men Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) have been derived from the embryos of mice and humans, representing the two major sources of PSCs. These cells are universally defined by their developmental properties, specifically their self-renewal capacity and differentiation potential which are regulated in mice and humans by complex transcriptional networks orchestrated by conserved transcription factors. However, significant differences exist in the transcriptional networks and signaling pathways that control mouse and human PSC self-renewal and lineage development. To distinguish between universally applicable and species-specific features, we collated and compared the molecular and cellular descriptions of mouse and human PSCs. Here we compare and contrast the response to signals dictated by the transcriptome and epigenome of mouse and human PSCs that will hopefully act as a critical resource to the field. These analyses underscore the importance of accounting for species differences when designing strategies to capitalize on the clinical potential of human PSCs.

publication date

  • 2010