The use of imaging in endometrial cancer prior to potential surgery: Are guidelines being followed? Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • OBJECTIVES: Clinical practice guidelines recommend against routine preoperative axial imaging studies (CT/MRI) for endometrial cancer, except for cases of locally advanced disease or aggressive histologies. This study utilized population-based data to evaluate the use of preoperative imaging and factors associated with its use. METHODS: A population-based cohort of women diagnosed with endometrial cancer from 2006 to 2016 were identified from the Ontario Cancer Registry in Ontario, Canada. Patients were excluded if they had: hysterectomy prior to the date of diagnosis, non-epithelial histology or a prior cancer diagnosis within 5 years. Preoperative imaging (CT or MRI) rates were calculated over time. Predictive factors for preoperative imaging use were determined using multi-variable regression analysis. RESULTS: 17,718 cases were eligible for analysis. From 2006 to 2016, the proportion of patients receiving preoperative imaging increased from 22.2% to 39.3%. In a subgroup of patients with low-risk disease (stage 1, endometrioid adenocarcinoma), imaging increased from 16.3% to 29.5%. Multivariate analysis showed an association between preoperative imaging and advanced stage, advanced grade, non-endometrioid morphology, surgery with a gynecologic oncologist, surgery at a teaching hospital and a later year of diagnosis. From 2006 to 2016, the yearly incidence of endometrial cancer increased from 22.3/100,000 to 36.1/100,000, representing a mean annual increase of 3.6% per year. CONCLUSIONS: Endometrial cancer incidence and the use of preoperative imaging are increasing. Factors most associated with preoperative imaging are high-risk features. However, preoperative imaging is still being performed in low-risk patients, indicating non-adherence to guidelines, which has implications for constrained healthcare resources.

publication date

  • May 2021

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