Platelet transfusion practice and platelet refractoriness for a cohort of pediatric oncology patients: A single‐center study Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • BACKGROUND: Platelet transfusions are an essential aspect of supportive care for pediatric oncology patients. Data regarding the frequency of transfusions, pretransfusion thresholds, posttransfusion increments, and rate of platelet transfusion refractoriness (PTR) are lacking. STUDY OBJECTIVES: (a) describe platelet transfusion practice for children with malignancy; (b) determine the normal platelet increment following platelet transfusion; and (c) assess rate of PTR. METHODS: Inpatient pediatric oncology patients <18 years old and treated between 2009 and 2013 were identified. Data collected retrospectively included patient demographics, clinical information, laboratory values, and transfusion details. RESULTS: Three hundred sixty-seven children were included and 144 (39%) received at least one platelet transfusion. Platelets were transfused during 25% of all inpatient admissions. The median number of platelet transfusion for any given inpatient admission was two (interquartile range [IQR]: 1-3). The median pretransfusion platelet count was 16 × 109 /L and posttransfusion increment was 25 × 109 /L. Most (79%) of the time, the pretransfusion platelet count was >10 × 109 /L. Older children who received ABO incompatible platelet transfusions with a longer storage duration were more likely to have a poor platelet response (increment ≤ 10 × 109 /L). The rate of PTR (immune and/or nonimmune) was low (8%; 11/144). CONCLUSIONS: Practical information to parents and clinicians of newly diagnosed children regarding the likelihood and frequency of platelet transfusions was determined. The rate of PTR was low, supporting the hypothesis that children receiving leukoreduced products are at a low risk of PTR.

publication date

  • December 2020