Differences in fracture prevalence and in bone mineral density between Chinese and White Canadians: the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMos) Academic Article uri icon

  •  
  • Overview
  •  
  • Research
  •  
  • Identity
  •  
  • Additional Document Info
  •  
  • View All
  •  

abstract

  • Fracture determinants differ between Canadians of Chinese and White descent, the former constituting the second largest visible minority group in Canada. The results of this study support the importance of characterizing bone health predictors in Canadians of different ethnicity to improve population-specific fracture prevention and treatment strategies. PURPOSE: We aimed to compare clinical risk factors, bone mineral density, prevalence of osteoporosis, and fractures between Chinese and White Canadians to identify ethnicity-specific risks. METHODS: We studied 236 Chinese and 8945 White Canadians aged 25+ years from the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMos). The prevalence of osteoporosis using ethnicity-specific peak bone mass (PBM), and of prior and incident low trauma fractures were assessed and compared between groups. Linear regressions, adjusting for age and anthropometric measures, were used to examine the association between baseline and 5-year changes in BMD and ethnicity. RESULTS: Chinese participants had shorter stature, lower BMI, and lower rate of falls than White participants. Adjusted models showed no significant differences in baseline BMD between ethnic groups except in younger men where total hip BMD was 0.059 g/cm2 (0.009; 0.108) lower in Chinese. Adjusted 5-year BMD change at lumbar spine was higher in older Chinese women and men compared with Whites. When using Chinese-specific PBM, the prevalence of osteoporosis in Chinese women was 2-fold lower than when using that of White women The prevalence of fractures was higher in White women compared with Chinese with differences up to 14.5% (95% CI 9.2; 19.7) and 10.5% (95% CI 4.5-16.4) in older White men. Incident fractures were rare in young Chinese compared with White participants and not different in the older groups. CONCLUSION: Our results support the importance of characterizing bone strength predictors in Chinese Canadians and the development of ethnicity-specific fracture prediction and prevention strategies.

publication date

  • December 2020