Cardiorespiratory Monitoring Data during Sleep in Healthy Canadian Infants Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Rationale: Sleep study interpretation in children needs to be based on age-specific normal values. Although several studies have reported normal cardiorespiratory parameters during sleep in children and adolescents, few have included younger children.Objectives: To describe cardiopulmonary indices, specifically oxygen saturation and heart rate, as well as frequency of obstructive and central apneas in healthy 1-year-old Canadian infants during sleep.Methods: Home sleep cardiorespiratory monitoring was performed among infants participating in the Edmonton subcohort of the CHILD (Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development) study at their 1-year follow-up visit. A portable sleep monitoring device, which included a nasal pressure cannula, an oronasal thermal airflow sensor, a pulse oximeter, and respiratory inductance plethysmography belts, was used to collect sleep architecture and cardiorespiratory data during one night of monitoring in the home. Sleep scoring was done in blocks of 5 minutes using a novel pilot sleep scoring algorithm.Results: Among the 562 subjects (mean ± standard deviation age 1.1 ± 0.2 yr) who attempted home sleep cardiorespiratory monitoring, 91% provided technically acceptable data with no loss of signal preventing analysis of any parameter. Obstructive and central apneas were rare, with a median obstructive apnea index of 0.0 events/h (10th percentile, 0.0; 90th percentile, 0.5) and a median central apnea index of 2.5 events/h (10th percentile, 0.6; 90th percentile, 7.1). Median oxygen saturation was 97.0% (10th percentile, 95.4; 90th percentile, 97.9). The oxygen desaturation index was 6.7 events/h (10th percentile, 1.4; 90th percentile, 15.8), with infants spending only 0.1% (10th percentile, 0.0; 90th percentile, 0.6) of the time with an oxygen saturation below 92%.Conclusions: These results provide important reference data for healthy infants undergoing cardiorespiratory monitoring during sleep.

authors

  • Vézina, Kevin
  • Mariasine, Jennifer
  • Young, Rochelle
  • Reyna, Myrtha
  • Lu, Zihang
  • Subbarao, Padmaja
  • Moraes, Theo J
  • Becker, Allan B
  • Turvey, Stuart E
  • Sears, Malcolm
  • Lefebvre, Diana L
  • Azad, Meghan B
  • Rasmussen, Carmen
  • Pei, Jacqueline
  • Narang, Indra
  • Mandhane, Piush J

publication date

  • October 2020