Models of Care and Team Activities in the Delivery of Transgender Primary Care: An Ontario Case Study Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Purpose: Transgender individuals experience barriers accessing primary care. In Ontario, primary care is delivered through a variety of delivery models. Literature supports team delivery of primary care for transgender individuals, yet little is known about care delivery in Ontario and the role of primary care teams. We intend to explore how primary care for transgender individuals is delivered within the different primary care models in Ontario and the roles primary care team members enact in care delivery, barriers, enablers, and clinical competence of practitioners in delivering transgender care. Methods: Case study methodology was used to compare transgender care across three Ontario primary care models. Key informants identified cases known to provide transgender care for case selection. Qualitative interviews were conducted. Documentary evidence and field notes were collected. Results: Practitioners clearly articulated their role and activities they were responsible for in providing care, however, they tended to work independently. In cases with an interdisciplinary team there was limited collaboration. Nurse practitioners, physicians, and counselors contributed most to the delivery of care. Key challenges included lack of service coordination within organizations, and the need for practitioner education. Continuing educational sessions, guidelines, and mentorship aided capacity building. Conclusions: Providing primary care to transgender individuals is within the scope of practice for primary care practitioners and can be part of routine care delivered in different models of care. Primary care team collaboration can be strengthened by regular team meetings. Professional training needs to include transgender education and continuing education opportunities need development.

publication date

  • June 1, 2020