The Relationship between Texture-Modified Diets, Mealtime Duration, and Dysphagia Risk in Long-Term Care Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Many long-term care (LTC) residents have an increased risk for dysphagia and receive texture-modified diets. Dysphagia has been shown to be associated with longer mealtime duration, and the use of texture-modified diets has been associated with reduced nutritional intake. The current study aimed to determine if the degree of diet modification affected mealtime duration and to examine the correlation between texture-modified diets and dysphagia risk. Data were collected from 639 LTC residents, aged 62ā€“102 years. Nine meal observations per resident provided measures of meal duration, consistencies consumed, coughing and choking, and assistance provided. Dysphagia risk was determined by identifying residents who coughed/choked at meals, were prescribed thickened fluids, and/or failed a formal screening protocol. Degree of texture modification was derived using the International Dysphagia Diet Standardization Initiative Functional Diet Scale. There was a significant association between degree of diet modification and dysphagia risk (Pā€‰<ā€‰0.001). However, there was no association between diet modifications and mealtime duration, even when the provision of physical assistance was considered. Some residents who presented with signs of swallowing difficulties were not prescribed a texture-modified diet. Swallowing screening should be performed routinely in LTC to monitor swallowing status and appropriateness of diet prescription. Physical assistance during meals should be increased.

publication date

  • September 1, 2019