Laparoscopic colorectal resection in octogenarians Academic Article uri icon

  •  
  • Overview
  •  
  • Research
  •  
  • Identity
  •  
  • Additional Document Info
  •  
  • View All
  •  

abstract

  • BACKGROUND: The number and proportion of patients aged ?80 years are increasing. These patients often require surgical care and suffer subsequent high rates of morbidity and mortality. However, the surgical outcomes of laparoscopic colorectal resection in octogenarians are not well documented. METHODS: Octogenarians were identified from a large prospective database comprising 507 consecutive laparoscopic colorectal resections performed between 1991 and 1999 in a university setting. Preoperative comorbidity and surgical outcomes were analyzed. RESULTS: Sixty-two patients (30 men, 32 women) aged ?80 years were identified. Their mean age and weight were 85 years and 63 kg, respectively. Seven patients (11%) were converted to an open procedure. Four (6%) intraoperative complications occurred in four patients (one colon perforation, one small bowel perforation, one burned gallbladder serosa, and one missed lesion), necessitating two conversions. Twenty -four postoperative complications occurred in 19 patients (31%) (six ileus [10%], five wound infections [8%], five cardiac problems [8%], two urinary retentions [3%], two hemorrhages [3%], one abscess [2%], one pneumonia [2%], and two other [3%]). Intraoperative complications did not increase postoperative morbidity. Three patients (5%) died within 30 days of surgery. When the procedure was completed laparoscopically, the overall median postoperative hospital stay was 10.0 days; occurrence of a postoperative complication increased the median length of stay to 15.0 days. CONCLUSIONS: These results are superior to published historical controls involving open colorectal resection in octogenarians. Overall mortality, lung, and urinary tract complications were decreased, and there were no reoperations for small bowel obstruction. Laparoscopic colorectal resection is technically feasible and can be done safely in elderly patients. Results require randomization against those for open surgery to elucida te the real advantages of this technique.

publication date

  • August 2001