Demoralization-led migration in Bangladesh: A sense of insecurity-based decision-making model Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Political hostility, unrest and flawed governance cause insecurity leading to demoralization, which triggers migration. There is a large body of literature on the determinants of international migration that highlights a range of factors to explain the direction and strength of migrant flows. For this research we interviewed 32 respondents who were a control group in a study conducted a decade ago. These respondents were determined not to migrate, but their migration decision was reversed over a period of 10 years. This article explores the relation between a sense of insecurity and the demoralization that influences migration decisions. It further investigates the causes that contributed to this change. As democracy shrinks, authoritarianism expands, implying that there is no accountability. This leads a country to widespread corruption, creating severe social injustices. People in general become demoralized and decide to migrate out. This article adds to the body of work by focusing on whether the migration decision is a response to widespread corruption, prevailing political conditions, violence, conflict, poor governance, an absence of rule of law and freedom or declining of democratic space in Bangladesh.

publication date

  • December 2020