Non-radical surgery for small early-stage cervical cancer. Is it time? Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • OBJECTIVES: Non-radical surgery has been proposed in women with early-stage cervical cancer to reduce morbidity. Our objective was to evaluate the outcomes of women with early-stage cervical cancer treated with non-radical surgery. METHODS: Between March 1991 and July 2013, 51 women with early-stage cervical cancer underwent simple hysterectomy or cone biopsy. All patients had assessment of pelvic lymph nodes. Patient demographics, stage, perioperative complications, pathology findings and disease-free interval were collected prospectively. RESULTS: Twenty-six women had squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), 22 adenocarcinoma (AC) and 3 adenosquamous (AS) carcinoma. Thirty women were FIGO stage 1A1, 8 women IA2, and 13 women 1B1. Twenty-two (43%) and 29 (57%) women underwent simple hysterectomy and cone biopsy respectively. Median measurable tumor size was 10mm (range 2-11), and median depth of invasion was 2.0mm (range 0.1-12 mm). Lymphovascular space invasion (LVSI) was present in 18 women (35%). Surgical margins were negative in all women. Two women received adjuvant chemoradiation (one had deep stromal invasion with LVSI, and one had two micrometastases to pelvic nodes). Forty-nine women (96%) had their Foley catheter removed on the day of surgery or post-operative day 1. No intraoperative or postoperative complications occurred and the median blood loss was 100ml. Median follow-up was 21 months (range 1-112). None of the 51 women developed a recurrence during follow-up (95% CI: 0-6%). CONCLUSION: Non-radical surgery in appropriately selected early-stage cervical cancer patients results in a low complication rate and excellent oncologic outcomes. This approach seems to be a reasonable option in well-selected patients.

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publication date

  • March 2014