The Usefulness of the Thyroid Imaging Reporting and Data System in Determining Thyroid Malignancy Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: To determine the effect of a modified Thyroid Imaging and Reporting Data System (TIRADS) in predicting malignancy in surgically treated nodules. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective review. METHODS: This study was carried out at a tertiary care center from July 2016 to July 2017. Patients were included if they had a thyroid nodule that had an ultrasound assessment with subsequent fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) as well as surgical resection. Patients were excluded if they had previous head and neck surgery. Patients were stratified into those who had a formal modified TIRADS report by the radiologist versus those who had an ultrasound report without TIRADS reporting. FNAB results were reported as per Bethesda Thyroid Cytology Criteria, and the final pathology report was nominalized as malignant or benign. RESULTS: One hundred twenty-four consecutive patients who met the inclusion criteria listed above were included within the study. Thirty one patients (25%) had a modified TIRADS report from the radiologist, whereas 93 patients (75%) did not. There was no statistical significance between the two groups in terms of: gender (P = .24), age (P = .77), FNAB results (P = .95), final surgical pathology (P = .90), or incidental findings of malignancy (P = .09). Comparative analysis showed no statistically significant difference between the two groups in terms of the concordance of FNAB and a final pathological diagnosis of malignancy (P = .91). CONCLUSIONS: Despite the known diagnostic utility of the TIRADS in relation to FNAB results and its widespread use, this study shows that the overall detection of malignancy is not statistically different in those who received a modified TIRADS report. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 3 Laryngoscope, 130: 2087-2091, 2020.

publication date

  • August 2020