How can the results of the COMPASS trial benefit patients with coronary or peripheral artery disease in Poland Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Aspirin decreases the risk of recurrent thrombotic events in patients with coronary artery disease or peripheral artery disease but the risk of recurrent events remains high. Long‑term dual antiplatelet therapy or the combination of aspirin and warfarin further reduces the risk of recurrent events, but at the cost of increased bleeding, and neither of these treatments reduce mortality. The COMPASS (Cardiovascular Outcomes in People Using Anticoagulation Strategies) randomized controlled trial involving 27 395 patients from 602 sites in 33 countries (Poland: 9 sites, 518 patients) tested whether low‑dose anticoagulant therapy with the coagulation factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban given alone or combined with aspirin reduced thrombotic risk compared with aspirin in patients with apparently stable chronic coronary and/or peripheral artery disease. In patients treated with the combination of rivaroxaban 2.5 mg twice daily and aspirin 100 mg once daily, compared with aspirin alone, the primary outcome of the composite of cardiovascular death, stroke, or myocardial infarction was decreased by 24% (hazard ratio, 0.76; 95% confidence interval, 0.66 to 0.86; P <0.001), and mortality by 18% at the cost of a 70% increase in major bleeding but no significant increase in fatal or intracranial bleeding. Results were consistent in patients with coronary artery disease or peripheral artery disease, and the greatest absolute benefit was evident in the highest risk patients, including those with polyvascular disease, mild or moderate heart failure, chronic kidney disease, or diabetes. These results establish the combination of low‑dose rivaroxaban and aspirin as a highly effective treatment to decrease morbidity and mortality rates in patients with atherosclerotic vascular disease..

publication date

  • May 30, 2019