Identification with ancestral culture is associated with fewer internalizing problems among older Naskapi adolescents Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • The manifestations of externalizing and internalizing behaviors among minority adolescents might best be understood by examining their relation to culturally specific factors, such as cultural identity, as well as to factors that seem to be relevant across cultures, such as age and gender. In this study, we examined the roles of age and gender in moderating the relation between self-reported cultural identity and externalizing and internalizing problems and the interaction between Indigenous and Mainstream cultural identity in relation to problematic behaviors. The participants included 61 students (32 female) with a mean age of 14.5 years (SD = 1.69) from a Naskapi reserve in Quebec, Canada. Age moderated the relation between identification with Indigenous culture and internalizing symptomatology. Indigenous and Mainstream cultural identity did not interact in predicting internalizing or externalizing problems. Consistent with the available evidence regarding the centrality of identity in adolescent development, the magnitude of the inverse relation between identification with Indigenous culture and number of clinical internalizing symptoms appears to increase in significance later in adolescence. The lack of an interaction between Indigenous and Mainstream cultural identity in relation to internalizing and externalizing problems suggests that it is the need to consider both cultures individually without the assumption that one negates the other.

authors

  • Blacklock, Adrienne
  • Schmidt, Louis
  • Fryberg, Stephanie A
  • Klassen, Gillian H
  • Querengesser, Johanna
  • Stewart, Jillian
  • Campbell, Colin Andrew
  • Flores, Heidi
  • Reynolds, Ashley
  • Tootoosis, Curtis
  • Burack, Jacob A

publication date

  • April 2020