Blended face-to-face and online/computer-based education approaches in chronic disease self-management: A critical interpretive synthesis Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • OBJECTIVE: To review the literature on chronic disease self-management programs that blend face-to-face and online/computer-based education design and delivery. METHODS: A critical interpretive synthesis was conducted. Studies that described blended chronic disease self-management programs were reviewed. Two reviewers performed independent database searches, eligibility screening, and data extraction. Findings were synthesized using a conceptual mapping process. RESULTS: Twelve articles were included in the final review. Studies focused on patients with diagnoses of diabetes, asthma, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder. Factors influencing the design and delivery of programs focused on patient characteristics (such as disease prognosis, time since diagnosis, social determinants of health, health literacy, and proficiency with online/computer-based technologies). CONCLUSIONS: Blended learning self-management programs should consider the suitability of programs in light of health conditions and patient characteristics. Individual patient needs can be identified through clinician-driven assessments, including collaborative goal setting and the selection of pertinent educational tools. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: When considering the design and delivery of chronic disease self-management education programs, healthcare providers should consider three factors: 1) patient characteristics, 2) learning perspectives, and 3) design technology options that best meet patient abilities, clinician expertise, and administrative capacity.

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publication date

  • October 2019