Comparison of Ajmaline and Procainamide Provocation Tests in the Diagnosis of Brugada Syndrome Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • OBJECTIVES: The authors studied the response rates and relative sensitivity of the most common agents used in the sodium-channel blocker (SCB) challenge. BACKGROUND: A type 1 Brugada electrocardiographic pattern precipitated by an SCB challenge confers a diagnosis of Brugada syndrome. METHODS: Patients undergoing an SCB challenge were prospectively enrolled across Canada and the United Kingdom. Patients with no prior cardiac arrest and family histories of sudden cardiac death or Brugada syndrome were included. RESULTS: Four hundred twenty-five subjects underwent SCB challenge (ajmaline, n = 331 [78%]; procainamide, n = 94 [22%]), with a mean age of 39 ± 15 years (54% men). Baseline non-type 1 Brugada ST-segment elevation was present in 10%. A total of 154 patients (36%) underwent signal-averaged electrocardiography, with 41% having late potentials. Positive results were seen more often with ajmaline than procainamide infusion (26% vs. 4%, p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, baseline non-type 1 Brugada ST-segment elevation (odds ratio [OR]: 6.92; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.15 to 15.2; p < 0.001) and ajmaline use (OR: 8.76; 95% CI: 2.62 to 29.2; p < 0.001) were independent predictors of positive results to SCB challenge. In the subgroup undergoing signal-averaged electrocardiography, non-type 1 Brugada ST-segment elevation (OR: 9.28; 95% CI: 2.22 to 38.8; p = 0.002), late potentials on signal-averaged electrocardiography (OR: 4.32; 95% CI: 1.50 to 12.5; p = 0.007), and ajmaline use (OR: 12.0; 95% CI: 2.45 to 59.1; p = 0.002) were strong predictors of SCB outcome. CONCLUSIONS: The outcome of SCB challenge was significantly affected by the drug used, with ajmaline more likely to provoke a type 1 Brugada electrocardiographic pattern compared with procainamide. Patients undergoing SCB challenge may have contrasting results depending on the drug used, with potential clinical, psychosocial, and socioeconomic implications.

authors

  • Cheung, Christopher C
  • Mellor, Greg
  • Deyell, Marc W
  • Ensam, Bode
  • Batchvarov, Velislav
  • Papadakis, Michael
  • Roberts, Jason D
  • Leather, Richard
  • Sanatani, Shubhayan
  • Healey, Jeffrey Sean
  • Chauhan, Vijay S
  • Birnie, David H
  • Champagne, Jean
  • Angaran, Paul
  • Klein, George J
  • Yee, Raymond
  • Simpson, Christopher S
  • Talajic, Mario
  • Gardner, Martin
  • Yeung-Lai-Wah, John A
  • Chakrabarti, Santabhanu
  • Laksman, Zachary W
  • Sharma, Sanjay
  • Behr, Elijah R
  • Krahn, Andrew D

publication date

  • April 2019