Effects of a Collaborative Intervention Process on Parent–Therapist Interaction: A Randomized Controlled Trial Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Aim: To determine whether a collaborative intervention process facilitates parent-therapist interactions. Methods: Participants were 18 children with physical disabilities, their mothers, and 16 physical therapists. Therapists randomized to the experimental group were instructed in strategies for collaboration (working together) with parents in goal setting, planning, and implementing interventions. Family-therapist dyads participated in 6 weekly sessions. Four sessions were videotaped and combined (1st and 2nd for goal-setting/planning, 3rd and 5th for implementation) to code behaviors using Response Class Matrix. Multivariate analysis of variance was used to compare therapist and parent behaviors between groups. Results: Therapists in the experimental group demonstrated a higher frequency of "seeking information" (p < 0.01), "giving information" (p < 0.05), "positive behavior" (p < 0.01) and lower frequency of "child-related behavior" (p < 0.001) than therapists in the comparison group during goal-setting/planning and implementation. Parents in the experimental group demonstrated a higher frequency of "giving information" than parents in the comparison group (p < 0.01) during goal-setting/planning and implementation. Conclusion: Parents and therapists in the experimental group interacted more with each other, whereas those in the comparison group focused more on the child. The collaborative strategies appear to have increased parent participation in the intervention process, which has been a challenge for physical and occupational therapists.

authors

  • An, Mihee
  • Palisano, Robert
  • Yi, Chung-hwi
  • Chiarello, Lisa A
  • Dunst, Carl J
  • Gracely, Edward J

publication date

  • May 4, 2019