Extensive cardiopulmonary resuscitation of preterm neonates at birth and mortality and developmental outcomes Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • OBJECTIVE: To compare mortality and neurodevelopmental outcomes of extremely low gestational age neonates who received delivery room extensive cardiopulmonary resuscitation (DR-CPR) to those who did not require DR-CPR. METHODS: Preterm neonates born at <29 weeks' gestational age between January 2010 and September 2011 and assessed at Canadian Neonatal Follow-Up Network centers were studied. Neonates who received DR-CPR were compared to those who did not require DR-CPR using univariate and multivariable analyses. The primary outcome was a composite of mortality or any neurodevelopmental impairment at 18 to 24 months corrected age defined as the presence of any one or more of the following: cerebral palsy; Bayley-III cognitive, language, or motor composite scores <85 on any one of the components; sensorineural/mixed hearing loss or unilateral or bilateral visual impairment. Secondary outcomes were the individual components of the composite outcomes. RESULTS: Of the 2760 neonates born, 173 were excluded and remaining 2587 eligible neonates were included in our study. Of these 2068 had outcome data (80%) of whom 190 (9.2%) received DR-CPR. DR-CPR was independently associated with mortality or neurodevelopmental impairment (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.76; 95% CI 1.21-2.55) and mortality alone (aOR1.94; 95% CI 1.33-2.83). DR-CPR was also associated with increased odds of motor impairment (aOR 2.03; 95% CI 1.28-3.23). CONCLUSION: In extremely low gestational age neonates, DR-CPR was associated with higher odds of the composite outcome of mortality or neurodevelopmental impairment, mortality alone, and lower motor scores at 18 to 24 months' corrected age.

authors

  • Fischer, Nicole
  • Soraisham, Amuchou
  • Shah, Prakesh S
  • Synnes, Anne
  • Rabi, Yacov
  • Singhal, Nalini
  • Ting, Joseph Y
  • Creighton, Dianne
  • Dewey, Deborah
  • Ballantyne, Marilyn
  • Lodha, Abhay
  • Shah, Prakesh S
  • Kanungo, Jaideep
  • Ting, Joseph
  • Yee, Wendy
  • Toye, Jennifer
  • Fajardo, Carlos
  • Kalapesi, Zarin
  • Sankaran, Koravangattu
  • Daspal, Sibasis
  • Seshia, Mary
  • Alvaro, Ruben
  • Mukerji, Amit
  • Da Silva, Orlando
  • Nwaesei, Chuks
  • Lee, Kyong-Soon
  • Dunn, Michael
  • Lemyre, Brigitte
  • Dow, Kimberly
  • Pelausa, Ermelinda
  • Lapoint, Anie
  • Drolet, Christine
  • Piedboeuf, Bruno
  • Claveau, Martine
  • Beltempo, Marc
  • Bertelle, Valerie
  • Masse, Edith
  • Canning, Roderick
  • Makary, Hala
  • Ojah, Cecil
  • Monterrosa, Luis
  • Emberley, Julie
  • Afifi, Jehier
  • Kajetanowicz, Andrzej
  • Lee, Shoo K
  • Canadian Neonatal Follow-Up Network (CNFUN) Investigators
  • Pillay, Thevanisha
  • Synnes, Anne
  • Sauvé, Reg
  • Hendson, Leonora
  • Reichert, Amber
  • Bodani, Jaya
  • Sankaran, Koravangattu
  • Moddemann, Diane
  • Nwaesei, Chuks
  • Daboval, Thierry
  • Dow, Kimberly
  • Lee, David
  • Coughlin, Kevin
  • Ly, Linh
  • Kelly, Edmond
  • Saigal, Saroj
  • Church, Paige
  • Pelausa, Ermelinda
  • Riley, Patricia
  • Luu, Thuy Mai
  • Lefebvre, Francine
  • Demers, Charlotte
  • Bélanger, Sylvie
  • Canning, Roderick
  • Monterrosa, Luis
  • Makary, Hala
  • Afifi, Jehier
  • Vincer, Michael
  • Murphy, Phil

publication date

  • February 2019