Factors Associated with Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Concentration in Two Cohorts of Pregnant Women in Southern Ontario, Canada Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Vitamin D deficiency in pregnancy is widely reported, but whether this applies in North America is unclear since no population-based surveys of vitamin D status in pregnancy exist in Canada or the United States. The objectives were to assess (i) the intake and sources of vitamin D, (ii) vitamin D status, and (iii) factors associated with serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) concentration in two cohorts of pregnant women from Southern Ontario, Canada, studied over a span of 14 years. Maternal characteristics, physical measurements, fasting blood samples and nutrient intake were obtained at enrolment in 332 pregnant women from the Family Atherosclerosis Monitoring In early Life (FAMILY) study and 191 from the Be Healthy in Pregnancy (BHIP) study. Serum 25-OHD was measured by LC/MS-MS. The median (Q1, Q3) total vitamin D intake was 383 IU/day (327, 551) in the FAMILY study and 554 IU/day (437, 796) in the BHIP study. Supplemental vitamin D represented 64% of total intake in participants in FAMILY and 78% in BHIP. The mean (SD) serum 25-OHD was 76.5 (32.9) nmol/L in FAMILY and 79.7 (22.3) nmol/L in BHIP. Being of European descent and blood sampling in the summer season were significantly associated with a higher maternal serum 25-OHD concentration. In summary, health care practitioners should be aware that vitamin D status is sufficient in the majority of pregnant Canadian women of European ancestry, likely due to sun exposure.

publication date

  • January 9, 2019

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