Anti-infectives-induced adverse drug reactions in hospitalized patients Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • OBJECTIVES: To assess the rate and seriousness of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) attributable to anti-infective agents in hospitalized patients; to estimate the likelihood of experiencing anti-infectives-induced ADRs at different length of drug usage in the hospital; to compare different classes of anti-infectives in inducing ADRs; to determine the impact of age and sex on anti-infectives-induced ADRs. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. PARTICIPANTS: Patients admitted to the infectious diseases department at a university teaching hospital, on Sunday to Wednesday, over a 9 months period, who received at least one anti-infective agent were eligible to enter the study. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Any suspected noxious and untoward medical events, including laboratory tests abnormalities following anti-infective therapy. METHODS: All patients admitted have received at least one anti-infective drug. Anti-infective agents induced ADRs were detected by interviewing patients and daily chart review. The seriousness, causality, and type of reactions were classified based on World Health Organization (WHO) definitions. Chi-square analysis was performed to assess the influence of sex and age on occurring ADRs. Both Kaplan-Meier and life table method were used to estimate the time to occur the ADR in anti-infective users. To compare the estimated risk of ADRs induced by different classes of anti-infectives, odds ratios were estimated. In all classes of anti-infectives, the odds ratio of each class was estimated with regard to anti-tuberculosis agents, which had the highest prevalence of ADRs. RESULTS: During the study period, 460 patients were entered the study. During the same period, 38 ADRs were recognized of which 20 (42%) were serious. The most recognized ADRs were suspected to be induced by anti-tuberculosis agents (29.8%). However in comparing with anti-tuberculosis agents, anti-fungal agents were associated with the highest ADR rate (odds ratio [OR], 4.21; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.41-1.256) whereas cephalosporines were associated with the lowest rate, (OR, 0.1; 95%CI, 0.04-0.26). The survival analysis shows that the likelihood of experiencing an ADR was increased at first 14 days of drug therapy. Also Chi-square analysis shows that greater risk of anti-infectives-induced ADRs was observed in women. CONCLUSION: The rate of ADRs induced by anti-infective agents in this study was 8.2%. This is higher than a standard (5%) which has been reported in other studies. This study also shows that some of the classes of anti-infective agents like anti-fungals need more attention.

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publication date

  • July 2005