Characterization of a Novel Primary Mammary Tumor Cell Line Reveals that Cyclin D1 Is Regulated by the Type I Insulin-Like Growth Factor Receptor Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • The importance of type I insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-IR) overexpression in mammary tumorigenesis was recently shown in two separate transgenic models. One of these models, the MTB-IGFIR transgenics, was generated in our lab to overexpress IGF-IR in mammary epithelial cells in a doxycycline (Dox)-inducible manner. To complement this transgenic model, primary cells that retained Dox-inducible expression of IGF-IR were isolated from a transgenic mammary tumor. This cell line, RM11A, expressed high levels of IGF-IR, phosphorylated Akt, and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 in the presence of Dox. IGF-IR overexpression provided the primary tumor cells with a survival advantage in serum-free media and seemed to induce ligand-independent activation of the IGF-IR because RM11A cells cultured in the presence of Dox were largely nonresponsive to exogenous IGFs. IGF-IR overexpression also augmented the growth of RM11A cells in vivo because injection of these cells into mammary glands of wild-type mice produced palpable tumors in 15.8 +/- 3.4 days when the mice were administered Dox, compared with 57.8 +/- 6.3 days in the absence of Dox. DNA microarray analysis revealed a number of genes regulated by IGF-IR, one of which was cyclin D1. Suppression of IGF-IR expression in vitro or in vivo was associated with a decrease in cyclin D1 protein, suggesting that at least some of the proliferative actions of IGF-IR are mediated through cyclin D1. Therefore, this article characterizes the first primary murine mammary tumor cell line with inducible IGF-IR expression. These cells provide a powerful in vitro/in vivo model to examine the function of IGF-IR in mammary tumorigenesis.

publication date

  • May 1, 2008

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