Medical conditions, medications, and urinary incontinence. Analysis of a population-based survey. Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • OBJECTIVE: To assess associations between various medical conditions and drug treatments and reports of urinary incontinence. DESIGN: Secondary analysis of responses to the second wave of the National Population Health Survey (NPHS). Odds ratios were calculated using survey-weighted multiple logistic regression; confidence intervals were calculated using bootstrap methods. SETTING: Canadian households in all 10 provinces, as assessed by Statistics Canada's NPHS. PARTICIPANTS: From among respondents to the NPHS, the 54,920 people aged 30 years or older. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Responses to the question "Do you have urinary incontinence diagnosed by a health professional?" and analysis of variables related to medical conditions and medications. RESULTS: Urinary incontinence was associated with strokes, arthritis, and back problems in both sexes. Odds ratios for incontinence were elevated among men and women who reported having asthma. Narcotics and diuretics were strongly associated with incontinence in both sexes. Psychoactive medications were associated with incontinence in women; antidepressants were associated with incontinence in men. CONCLUSION: Physicians should consider the possibility that patients with common conditions, such as arthritis, back problems, or respiratory conditions associated with coughing, might also have urinary incontinence. Physicians should also be aware that urinary incontinence might be a side effect of therapies and make relevant inquiries. Medications associated with incontinence could be changed.

publication date

  • January 2002