Quartz crystal microbalance study of protein adsorption kinetics on poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • The interaction of macromolecules with artificial biomaterials may lead to potentially serious complications upon implantation into a biological environment. The interaction of one of the most widely used biomaterials, polyHEMA, with lysozyme, bovine serum albumin (BSA), and lactoferrin was investigated using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The concentration dependence of adsorption was measured for the aforementioned proteins individually as well as for lysozyme-BSA, and lysozyme-lactoferrin combinations. An extension of Voinova's viscoelastic model to n layers was used to create thickness-time graphs for adsorption. For each of lactoferrin and lysozyme, two distinctly different timescales of adsorption could be differentiated. However, the mechanisms of adsorption appeared to differ between the two. Negative dissipation shifts were measured for low concentrations of lysozyme, trending to positive dissipation at higher concentrations. This suggested that lysozyme was adsorbed initially into the matrix, stiffening the hydrogel, and later onto the surface of polyHEMA. Additionally, trials with commercial no-rub cleaning solutions indicated little added effectiveness over buffer solutions. Mixtures of proteins showed behaviour which differed in some cases from the simple combination of single protein adsorption experiments.

publication date

  • September 2008