Characteristics of Referrals to an Inpatient Hospice and a Survey of General Practitioner Perceptions of Palliative Care Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • In order to determine symptoms, drug prescribing and physical problems of patients referred to an inpatient hospice, case notes from 130 consecutive first admissions (95 general practitioner (GP) referrals, 35 consultant referrals) were analysed. GP referrals were more likely to be constipated, require care and be discharged to home. Consultant referrals were more gravely ill, dependent and more likely to die in the hospice. On admission 76 (58%) patients were receiving opiates with co-prescription of opiate and laxative occurring in 41% (31/76) of the cases. The prescription of laxatives with the symptoms of constipation occurred in 62% (26/42) of the cases on admission. A telephone survey of 79 referring GPs revealed that 37% had attended neither a course nor a lecture relevant to palliative care in the past 3 years. GPs experienced difficulties frequently or always in: (a) managing pain (8/79); (b) managing other symptoms (25/79); (c) helping patients and relatives cope with their emotional distress (18/79); and (d) coping with their own emotional responses to death and dying (5/79). In conclusion, the differences demonstrated between the GP and consultant referrals have implications for purchasers. The high incidence of possible opiate-induced side-effects and the difficulties with symptom control expressed by some GPs indicate a continuing need for effective educational input.

publication date

  • February 1996