Intrauterine 5-aminolevulinic acid induces selective endometrial fluorescence in the rhesus and cynomolgus monkey Academic Article uri icon

  •  
  • Overview
  •  
  • Research
  •  
  • Identity
  •  
  • Additional Document Info
  •  
  • View All
  •  

abstract

  • OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the selectivity of endometrial photosensitization after intrauterine 5-aminolevulinic acid administration in nonhuman primates, and to assess acute and chronic systemic toxicity after intravenous (i.v.) delivery of 5-aminolevulinic acid. METHODS: Ovariectomized cynomolgus monkeys (n = 19) aged 6-18 years and ovariectomized rheusus monkeys (n = 3) aged 9-14 years were used in these studies, 5-aminolevulinic acid at various doses was administered by a transfundal (n = 8), transcervical (n = 3), or i.v. (n = 11) route. Spectrophoto-fluorometric readings and fluorescence microscopy were used to assess 5-aminolevulinic acid-induced photosensitization of uterine tissues; respiration, heart rate, blood biochemistry, and behavior were used to evaluate potential acute and delayed systemic toxicity. RESULTS: Endometrial fluorescence was achieved in all animals after administration of 5-aminolevulinic acid. Characteristic spectrophotofluorescence peaks of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) in the endometrium but not myometrium confirmed selective endometrial PpIX production from 5-aminolevulinic acid. A transient (less than 1 week) increase in serum aspartate aminotransferase was observed after systemic instillation of 5-aminolevulinic acid in dosages 24-50-fold greater than that required to induce endometrial photosensitization after intrauterine injection. CONCLUSIONS: The endometrium but not myometrium in nonhuman primates is capable of converting 5-aminolevulinic acid into protoporphyrin IX. At large doses, systemic 5-aminolevulinic acid causes a transient increase in the serum aspartate aminotransferase level. No other evidence of acute or delayed systemic toxicity was observed.

publication date

  • May 1996