The Effect of a Sensory Integration Program on Academic Achievement, Motor Performance, and Self-Esteem in Children Identified as Learning Disabled: Results of a Clinical Trial Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • A multicenter clinical trial was conducted to evaluate the effect of sensory integration therapy on the academic achievement, motor performance, and self-esteem of learning disabled children who have sensory integrative dysfunction. A sample of 67 children was randomized into one of two groups: sensory integrative (SI) and perceptual-motor therapy (PM). The Woodcock-Johnson Psychoeducational Battery, the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency, the Behavioral Academic Self-Esteem Rating Scale, and the Personality Inventory for Children were administered before therapy, after 6 months of therapy, and 3 months following cessation of therapy. Both the SI and PM groups improved on academic and motor measures. No group differences were detected on any measure. The implications of the findings and possible interpretations are discussed and future studies suggested.

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publication date

  • May 1991