Kommerell’s diverticulum and aneurysmal right-sided aortic arch: A case report and review of the literature Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Right-sided aortic arch is a rare variant of the thoracic vascular anatomy that may be accompanied by an aberrant origin of the left subclavian artery. We report a true aneurysm of the distal arch and descending thoracic aorta in a patient with right-sided arch and review previous descriptions of aneurysms of anomalous right-sided aortas. In our patient, the left subclavian artery originated at the junction between the distal arch and the descending thoracic aorta located in the right chest and was aneurysmal (Kommerell's diverticulum); the thoracic aorta was also aneurysmal. Extra-anatomic left subclavian-to-carotid transposition was performed before the intrathoracic procedure. Subsequently, a right thoracotomy provided adequate exposure for repairing the aortic aneurysm and oversewing the aneurysmal origin of the subclavian artery. Because the distal aortic arch was involved, deep hypothermia and circulatory arrest were used. Only five previous instances of true aneurysms of a right-sided aortic arch have been reported; four of these patients underwent operative repair (via bilateral thoracotomy, median sternotomy, or right thoracotomy). We believe that a right thoracotomy provides good exposure and avoids the morbidity associated with bilateral thoracotomy. The reconstruction of the subclavian artery has not previously been reported in this setting. Performing subclavian reconstruction as an extrathoracic procedure before the intrathoracic repair would be expected to reduce the subsequent risk of distal ischemia or subclavian steal without increasing the overall morbidity associated with the procedure.

publication date

  • December 2000