The potential of endurance exercise-derived exosomes to treat metabolic diseases Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Endurance exercise-mediated multisystemic adaptations are known to mitigate metabolism-related disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, the underlying molecular mechanisms that promote crosstalk between organs and orchestrate the pro-metabolic effects of endurance exercise remain unclear. Exercise-induced release of peptides and nucleic acids from skeletal muscle and other organs (collectively termed 'exerkines') has been implicated in mediating these systemic adaptations. Given that the extracellular milieu is probably not a hospitable environment for labile exerkines, a lipid vehicle-based mode of delivery has originated over the course of evolution. Two types of extracellular vesicles, exosomes and microvesicles, have been shown to contain proteins and nucleic acids that participate in a variety of physiological and pathological processes. Exosomes, in particular, have been shown to facilitate the exchange of peptides, microRNA, mRNA and mitochondrial DNA between cells and tissues. Intriguingly, circulatory extracellular vesicle content increases in an intensity-dependant manner in response to endurance exercise. We propose that the systemic benefits of exercise are modulated by exosomes and/or microvesicles functioning in an autocrine, paracrine and/or endocrine manner. Furthermore, we posit that native or modified exosomes, and/or microvesicles enriched with exerkines will have therapeutic utility in the treatment of obesity and T2DM.

publication date

  • September 2016