Response sensitivity of blast-loaded reinforced concrete structures to the number of degrees of freedomThis article is one of a selection of papers published in the Special Issue on Blast Engineering. Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Accurate analysis of reinforced concrete (RC) structures under blast loading is very complicated due to the nonlinear behaviour of concrete and reinforcement and the various failure modes to be considered. Although blast loads can excite a large number of modes due to their high frequency content, practical computational tools are usually limited to single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) models. In addition to oversimplification, SDOF models are known to give inaccurate prediction for shear forces and support reactions. This is because accurate shear force prediction typically requires accounting for modes higher than the fundamental mode. In this study, a multi-degree-of-freedom (MDOF) model is developed that takes into account the nonlinear behaviour of RC structures and the material strength and deformation dependency on the strain rate. Using this model, a series of dynamic analyses were carried out for two typical structural members, with different combination of blast pressure and impulse. The effect of varying the number of degrees of freedom (DOF) was investigated through increasing the number of nodes used to descretize each structural member. The results of the developed MDOF model were compared to the results of available SDOF models which demonstrated the deficiencies of the latter. The developed MDOF model, with few DOF, was found to be capable of accurately predicting the dynamic shear of the modeled structural members. The model was also compared to available experimental results and showed good agreement. Changing the number of DOF also affected the pressure–impulse (P–I) diagrams for the structural member significantly, especially in the impulsive regime.

publication date

  • August 2009