Is There a Downside to Schedule Control for the Work-Family Interface? Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Using data from a 2007 U.S. survey of workers, this article examines the implications of schedule control for work—family role blurring and work—family conflict. Four main findings indicate that (a) schedule control is associated with more frequent working at home and work—family multitasking activities; (b) the positive association between schedule control and multitasking suppresses the negative association between schedule control and work— family conflict; (c) the positive association between working at home and multitasking is weaker among individuals with greater schedule control; and (d) the positive association between work—family multitasking and work— family conflict is weaker among individuals with greater schedule control. Our findings reveal previously undocumented mediating, suppression, and moderating patterns in the ways that schedule control contributes to work—family role blurring and work—family conflict. The authors discuss the implications of these findings for views of schedule control as a “resource” and theories about the borders in the work—family interface.

publication date

  • October 2010