Physician labour supply in Canada: a cohort analysis Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • This paper employs a cohort analysis to examine the relative importance of different factors in explaining changes in the number of hours spent in direct patient care by Canadian general/family practitioners (GPs) over the period 1982-2003. Cohorts are defined by year of graduation from medical school. The results for male GPs indicate that there is little age effect on hours of direct patient care, especially among physicians aged 35-55, there is no strong cohort effect on hours of direct patient care, but there is a secular decline in hours of direct patient care over the period. The results for female GPs indicate that female physicians on average work fewer hours than male physicians, there is a clear age effect on hours of direct patient care, there is no strong cohort effect, and there has been little secular change in average hours of direct patient care. The changing behaviour of male GPs accounted for a greater proportion of the overall decline in hours of direct patient care from the 1980s through the mid-1990 s than did the growing proportion of female GPs in the physician stock.

publication date

  • April 2009