Workforce utilization of visible and linguistic minorities in Canadian nursing Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Aim  This study seeks to develop a diversity profile of the nursing workforce in Canada and its major cities. Background  There is ample evidence of ethnic and linguistic segregation in the Canadian labour market. However, it is unknown if there is equitable representation of visible and linguistic minorities in nursing professions. Methods  We cross-tabulated aggregate data from Statistics Canada's 2006 Census. Analyses examined the distribution of visible and linguistic minorities, including visible minority sub-groups, among health managers, head nurses, registered nurses, licensed nurses and nurse aides for Canada and major cities as well as by gender. Results  In Canada and its major cities, a pyramidal structure was found whereby visible and linguistic minorities, women in particular, were under-represented in managerial positions and over-represented in lower ranking positions. Blacks and Filipinos were generally well represented across nursing professions; however, other visible minority sub-groups lacked representation. Conclusions  Diversity initiatives at all levels can play a role in promoting better access to and quality of care for minority populations through the increased cultural and linguistic competence of care providers and organizations. Implications for Nursing Management  Efforts to increase diversity in nursing need to be accompanied by commitment and resources to effectively manage diversity within organizations.

publication date

  • January 2014