Control of spatial orienting: Context-specific proportion cued effects in an exogenous spatial cueing task Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Cognitive control refers to the ability to adjust strategy use based on the demands of a current context or task. Recent research using attentional filtering tasks has shown that cognitive control can adapt rapidly and automatically in accord with learning that is specific to particular tasks, items, and contexts (Crump, Gong, & Milliken, 2006; Fernandez-Duque & Knight, 2008; Jacoby, Lindsay, & Hessels, 2003). However, the role of context-specific control has not been investigated in detail in spatial orienting tasks. In a series of three experiments, the proportion of validly cued trials in an exogenous spatial cueing task was manipulated for one context but not for another context, with the two contexts intermixed randomly across trials. The results revealed that spatial/temporal contextual cues in conjunction, but not individually, produced context-specific control over spatial orienting.

publication date

  • November 2014