Characteristics Associated With Maintenance of Mean A1C <6.5% in People With Dysglycemia in the ORIGIN Trial Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • OBJECTIVE: To assess the success and baseline predictors of maintaining glycemic control for up to 5 years of therapy using basal insulin glargine or standard glycemic care in people with dysglycemia treated with zero or one oral glucose-lowering agents. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Data from 12,537 participants in the Outcome Reduction with Initial Glargine Intervention (ORIGIN) trial were examined by baseline glycemic status (with or without type 2 diabetes) and by therapeutic approach (titrated insulin glargine or standard therapy) using an intention-to-treat analysis. Median values for fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and A1C and percentages with A1C<6.5% (48 mmol/mol) during randomized treatment were calculated. Factors independently associated with maintaining updated mean A1C<6.5% were analyzed with linear regression models. RESULTS: Median A1C in the whole population was 6.4% at baseline; at 5 years, it was 6.2% with glargine treatment and 6.5% with standard care. Of those with diabetes at baseline, 60% using glargine and 45% using standard care had A1C<6.5% at 5 years. Lack of diabetes and lower baseline A1C were independently associated with 5-year mean A1C<6.5%. Maintaining mean A1C<6.5% was more likely with glargine (odds ratio [OR] 2.98 [95% CI 2.67-3.32], P<0.001) than standard care after adjustment for other independent predictors. CONCLUSIONS: Systematic intervention with basal insulin glargine or standard care early in the natural history of dysglycemia can maintain glycemic control near baseline levels for at least 5 years, whether diabetes is present at baseline or not. Keeping mean A1C<6.5% is more likely in people with lower baseline A1C and with the glargine-based regimen.

publication date

  • October 1, 2013