A Cohort Study of Pediatric Shock Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • INTRODUCTION: Pediatric shock is associated with significant morbidity and limited evidence suggests treatment with corticosteroids. The objective of this study was to describe practice patterns and outcomes associated with corticosteroid use in children with shock. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective, cohort study in four pediatric intensive care units (PICU) in Canada. Patients aged newborn to 17 years admitted to PICU with shock between January 2010 and June 2011 were eligible. RESULTS: 364 patients were included. The frequency of hydrocortisone administration was 22.3% overall (95% CI: 18.0, 26.5) and 59.4% in patients who received at least 60 cc/kg of fluid and were on two or more vasoactive agents. Patients administered hydrocortisone had higher PRISM scores (19, IQR 11-24 versus 9, IQR 5-16; P < 0.0001), higher inotrope scores (15, IQR 10-25 versus 7.5, IQR 3.3-10.6, P < 0.0001) and were more likely to have received 60 cc/kg of fluid resuscitation (59.3% versus 33.6%, OR 2.88, 95% CI: 2.09, 3.96). In an adjusted analysis, patients who received hydrocortisone spent more time on vasoactive infusions (64 versus 34  hours, hazard ratio 0.72, 95% CI: 0.62, 0.84) and had a higher incidence of positive cultures between day 4 and day 28 post admission (24.7% versus 14.5%, OR 1.79, 95% CI: 1.58, 2.04). CONCLUSION: Hydrocortisone administration was associated with longer time on vasopressors and increased incidence of positive cultures even after correcting for illness severity. Caution should be exercised in administering hydrocortisone for shock until there is clear evidence for benefit in this patient population.

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publication date

  • November 2015

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