Performance of the dynamic single photon emission computed tomography (dSPECT) method for decreasing or increasing activity changes Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Radionuclide imaging is now widely used whenever functional information is required. We present a new approach to dynamic SPECT imaging (dSPECT method) that uses a single slow rotation of a conventional camera and allows us to reconstruct a series of 3D images corresponding to the radiotracer distribution in the body at various times. Using simulations of various camera configurations and acquisition protocols, we have shown that this method is able to reconstruct washout half-lives with an accuracy greater than 90% when used with triple-head SPECT cameras. Accuracy decreases when using fewer camera heads, but dual-head geometries still give an accuracy greater than 80% for short and 90% for long half-lives and about 50-75% for single-head systems. Dynamic phantom experiments have yielded similar results. Presence of attenuation and background activity does not affect the accuracy of the dSPECT reconstructions. In all situations investigated satisfactory dynamic images were produced. A preliminary normal volunteer study measuring renal function was performed. The reconstructed dynamic images may be presented as a three-dimensional movie showing movement of the tracer through the kidneys and the measurement of the regional renal function can be performed. The time-activity curves determined from this dSPECT data are very similar to those obtained from dynamic planar scans.

authors

publication date

  • December 1, 2000