Jennifer Salerno
Assistant Professor (Part-Time), Health Research Methods, Evidence, and Impact

Dr. Jennifer Salerno’s research interests include chronic disease epidemiology and the application of epidemiology methods to trial research, population and public health, and health services research. She holds a PhD in Epidemiology from the University of Toronto, MSc in Community Health and Epidemiology from Queen’s University, and Honours BSc from McMaster University’s Biology and Pharmacology Co-operative Program. She completed fellowship training at both the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute in the area of traumatic brain injury and the U.S. National Institutes of Health (National Cancer Institute's Hormonal and Reproductive Epidemiology Branch) in breast cancer epidemiology. Her research interests include the epidemiology of brain injury and related dementias, and specifically, examining the etiology of cognitive function in aging populations using molecular/biochemical methods and advanced statistical models. She is currently a member of the American College of Epidemiology (ACE) and has held numerous leadership positions on the ACE Ethics Committee and ACE Board of Directors. More recently, she is involved with the International Epidemiological Association.

Currently, at McMaster University, she is a Research Associate for the McMaster Institute for Research on Aging | Collaborative for Health & Aging, in which she coordinates more than 50 researchers, trainees and community research partners as part of a newly established Ontario Strategy for Patient-Oriented Research SUPPORT Unit in aging. She is also involved in research in the Aging, Community and Health Research Unit focusing on a transitional care intervention in stroke and other community-based interventions for older adults with multiple chronic conditions.
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