Radiation Induced Mucositis: Co-ordinating a Research Agenda Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • AIMS: A one-day workshop was hosted by the Symptom Control Committee of the National Cancer Institute of Canada, Clinical Trials Group (NCIC-CTG), in conjunction with the October 2002 annual meeting of the Canadian Association of Radiation Oncologists in Toronto, Ontario. The primary intention of the workshop was to direct the future research agenda of the Symptom Control Committee. Large group presentations were held initially to review the contemporary research issues of four selected areas of interest: fatigue, brain metastasis, bone metastasis and radiation-induced mucositis. Panel members were then charged with the identification of specific research proposals that could be considered for further development. Research questions were to be clinically relevant and currently appropriate. Any additional information needed before the launch of any potential trial was also requested. In this paper, we will review and summarise the outcomes from the radiation-induced mucositis sessions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-four participants participated in the large group sessions and contributed to one of four panel discussions on selected supportive care issues relevant to radiation oncologists. RESULTS: Three potential and non-overlapping research questions were identified; two involving mucositis management in patients receiving radical radiation for head and neck cancer, and a third for patients with advanced lung cancer undergoing combined radiation and chemotherapy and at risk for the development of symptomatic oesophagitis. CONCLUSION: The workshop successfully identified three potential research questions. The large group and the smaller panel discussions successfully established consensus on important aspects of future study designs. The current 'standard of care', appropriate experimental treatments, primary outcomes of interest and study population parameters were each important issues that were discussed. The importance of developing meaningful biological assays was reviewed, as was the need to ensure the appropriate storage of biological samples from patients for future study.

publication date

  • December 2003