Barriers and Facilitators to Participation in Work among Canadian Women Living with HIV/AIDS Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • BACKGROUND: The impact of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) on the participation of women in paid/unpaid work is a little understood phenomenon. PURPOSE: A research study exploring the lived experiences of Canadian women's engagement in paid/unpaid work and the barriers and facilitators mediating this phenomenon. METHOD: Study design employed a phenomenological approach using data subanalysis of transcripts, double coded for agreement and to ensure saturation of themes. RESULTS: Analysis of the data revealed an overarching theme of engagement mediated by interacting forces with eight subthemes: active management, agency constrained by structure, the nature of supports, HIV/AIDS sequelae, work as a galvanizing force, the presence of children, the element of fear, and negotiation of self. IMPLICATIONS: Insights gained indicate a need for further education, resources, supports, and policy changes at the systems level. Occupational therapy is positioned to broaden the role of rehabilitation in the context of HIV/AIDS, episodic disability, and work participation.

publication date

  • October 2009